Marstel-Day, Wildlife Center of Virginia Hosted Events For Kids to Learn about Nocturnal Animals

Chapin Hardy of the Wildlife Center of Virginia with Athena, a barred owl, at CMoR Fredericksburg

Chapin Hardy of the Wildlife Center of Virginia with Athena, a barred owl, at CMoR Fredericksburg

Fredericksburg, VA (August 21, 2015) – International environmental consulting company Marstel-Day partnered with the Wildlife Center of Virginia, Friends of the Rappahannock, and Children’s Museum of Richmond (CMoR Fredericksburg) to hold the program “Whoo’s Awake in the Night” during two time slots on August 21. More than 140 adults and children came out to learn about opossums, owls, and other nocturnal creatures at events held at FOR and CMoR Fredericksburg.

These events were presented as part of Marstel-Day’s Wildlife Conservation Awareness Campaign (WCAC), a series started by CEO and President Rebecca R. Rubin to highlight issues facing wildlife and how people can help wildlife in their everyday lives. This event, tailored specifically for children, spotlighted how kids can start protecting animals at an early age as well as how their actions can affect wildlife in their own backyards.

In front of a crowd of families at Marstel-Day’s Wildlife Conservation Awareness Campaign event, Chapin Hardy of the Wildlife Center of Virginia discusses Albus, an Eastern rat snake, at the Friends of the Rappahannock site in Fredericksburg.

In front of a crowd of families at Marstel-Day’s Wildlife Conservation Awareness Campaign event, Chapin Hardy of the Wildlife Center of Virginia discusses Albus, an Eastern rat snake, at the Friends of the Rappahannock site in Fredericksburg.

The participants ranged in age from six months to early teens. The main message that Chapin Hardy of the Wildlife Center shared is what are nocturnal animals and how people can help protect them. Simple steps such as recycling and tossing no food waste on the roadside can have large impacts. The Wildlife Center, located in Waynesboro, VA, is an internationally acclaimed teaching and research hospital for wildlife and conservation medicine, as well as an outreach center for native wildlife.

After each event, the children asked questions about the animals they saw and shared personal wildlife experiences from their daily lives.

“Children are never too young to learn about wildlife and its importance to our planet,” Rubin said. “Today’s large turnout showed that families heartily welcome the opportunity for the youngest to see that they can make a difference. I’m thrilled by the success of our partnership with the Children’s Museum, the Friends of the Rappahannock, and the Wildlife Center of Virginia.”

The Wildlife Conservation Awareness Campaign launched in January 2015 and has featured a variety of speakers including senior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service official Bryan Arroyo, who spoke about how the illegal wildlife trade imperils endangered species, and 5 Gyres Institute cofounder Marcus Eriksen who discussed how plastics pollute the oceans and kill wildlife. The next talk will be held on September 17 and will feature Amy Gotliffe, conservation director at the Oakland Zoo. To learn more about the series, visit www.Marstel-Day.com.

 

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